Infective endocarditis: 10-year experience in a non-cardiovascular center




Arturo M. Ruiz-Beltran, Department of Internal Medicine, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutrición, Mexico City, Mexico
Clemente Barron-Magdaleno, Department of Cardiology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutrición, Mexico City, Mexico
Sandra M Ruiz-Beltran, Department of Anesthesiology, Hospital General Dr. Manuel Gea González, Mexico City, Mexico
Jose D. Sánchez-Villa, Department of Internal Medicine, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutrición, Mexico City, Mexico
Consuelo Orihuela-Sandoval, Department of Cardiology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutrición, Mexico City, Mexico
Jorge Oseguera-Moguel, Department of Cardiology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutrición, Mexico City, Mexico
Gerardo Payro-Ramírez, Department of Cardiology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutrición, Mexico City, Mexico


Background and objective: Infective endocarditis (IE) is an infection with a poor prognosis, and an associated in-hospital mortality of at least 25%. Optimal therapy of IE requires long-term effective antibiotic therapy and valve surgery in many cases. The aim of this study was to review the demographics, bacteriology, and outcomes of patients with IE admitted to a tertiary referral center in Mexico City, over a 10-year period. Methods: Retrospective cohort study of patients admitted at Instituto Nacional Salvador Zubiran with a new diagnosis of IE over a 10-year period, from January 2009 to January 2019. Patients who met the definition for definitive diagnosis of infective endocarditis according to the modified Duke criteria were included in the study. Results: There were 62 patients (50.85 ± 17.46 years, 40.3% females) with IE. The culprit microorganism was identified in all cases, with Staphylococcus aureus being the most frequently found (34%). Valve surgery was performed in 58.1%, while 41.9% only received medical treatment. The mortality rate was 25.8% at 30 days and 41.9% at 12 months. Comparing the surgical and medical treatment groups, we found that 50% and 36% in each group, respectively, had died within 12 months of admission. Conclusions: Our center has a high prevalence of health care-associated endocarditis, mostly related to the presence of intravascular access devices. Most of the patients had a surgical indication. Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and decreased right ventricular systolic function had an increased mortality rate at 12 months.



Keywords: Infective endocarditis. Health care-associated endocarditis. Heart valve disease.