Gender differences in mortality in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction




Grecia I. Raymundo-Martínez, Coronary Unit, Instituto Nacional de Cardiología “Ignacio Chávez”, Mexico City, Mexico Diego Araiza-Garaygordobil, Coronary Unit, Instituto Nacional de Cardiología “Ignacio Chávez”, Mexico City, Mexico Rodrigo Gopar-Nieto, Coronary Care Unit, Instituto Nacional de Cardiología “Ignacio Chávez”. Mexico City, Mexico Arnoldo E. Loáisiga-Sáenz, Coronary Unit, Instituto Nacional de Cardiología “Ignacio Chávez”, Mexico City, Mexico Luis A. Baeza-Herrera, Coronary Unit, Instituto Nacional de Cardiología “Ignacio Chávez”, Mexico City, Mexico Ricardo Pohls-Vázquez, Urgencias y Unidad de Cuidados Coronarios, Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez, Ciudad de México, México Laura V. Torres-Araujo, Urgencias y Unidad de Cuidados Coronarios, Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez, Ciudad de México, México Manuel Martínez-Ramos, Urgencias y Unidad de Cuidados Coronarios, Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez, Ciudad de México, México Arturo I. Alonso-Vázquez, Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez, Ciudad de México, México; 3Universidad Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, Maryland, EE.UU Itzel V. Delgado-Cruz, Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez, Ciudad de México, México; 3Universidad Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, Maryland, EE.UU Diestefano E. Ronquillo-Ramírez, Unidad Coronaria, Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez, Secretaría de Salud, Ciudad de México, México Alexandra Arias-Mendoza, Coronary Unit, Instituto Nacional de Cardiología “Ignacio Chávez”, Mexico City, Mexico


Background: Women with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) have worst outcomes than men. Objective: The objective of the study was to determine gender differences in mortality in patients with STEMI. Methods: Cohort study including patients with STEMI. We recorded demographic and clinical data, laboratory tests, and in-hospital mortality in patients who underwent primary angioplasty and pharmacoinvasive strategy. Kaplan–Meier analysis was used to assess mortality differences between both genders. Results: A total of 340 patients were analyzed, 296 males and 44 females. Mean age of the female group was 64.3 ± 12.3 years. About 98% of females were among Killip-Kimball Class I-II. They had higher risk scores compared to man, longer ischemic time and first medical contact with a difference in comparison to man of 47 and 60 min, respectively. Mortality was 9.1% (4) in the female group. Conclusions: Although the proportion of women had higher mortality than man, we did not found any difference with statistical significance probably due to the lack of representation. We need more awareness in the female population about STEMI, since longer first medical contact time and longer total ischemic time might be one possible explanation of a higher mortality.



Keywords: Myocardial infarction. Gender difference. ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. Mortality.